Wednesday, June 15, 2016

20 years of CISSP, ELOFANTs and other cybersecurity acronyms

This article is about some things I don't know, and some other things that you might not know.

For example, I don't know who was the first person to pass the exam to become a Certified Information System Security Professional or CISSP (pronounced sisp). The CISSP website says the certification program was launched in 1994.

(That means if someone tells you they've been a CISSP for more than 25 years, and the current year is 2016, then they may be fibbing.)

I became a CISSP in May of 1996, something that I wrote about recently in an article on We Live Security: What the CISSP? 20 years as a Certified Information Systems Security Professional. The CISSP qualification has served me very well over the last 20 years, so I felt obliged to address some of the reasons some people criticize it, and did so in that article. Those criticisms not withstanding, I would encourage anyone who meets the experience requirements for the CISSP to apply for, pass the test for, and then maintain CISSP certification (you need to earn continuing education credits every year to stay certified).

The place to start learning about CISSP is the website of the issuing body, the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium. This non-profit organization is known as (ISC)2 which is pronounced “I-S-C-squared” because the name contains two each of those three letters, which is cute but sometimes a pain for typographers and search engines.

Another cybersecurity acronym that's been on my mind lately is CISO, as in Chief Information Security Officer, a title often used to designate the person most directly responsible for the organization's information system security. I am studying CISOs as part of my studies at the University of Leicester. I will soon be launching a survey on the subject (that I will link here when it goes online).

Of course, a lot of CISO's have certifications from (ISC)2 and that reminds me of something else I don't know, the answer to an interesting question, one that is not asked during the six hour CISSP exam: Is (ISC)2 an acronym?

Seriously, I don't know the answer, but speaking of acronyms and unknowns, I coined an acronym for an unknown a few weeks ago: ELOFANT. Those letters stand for Employee Left Or Fired, Access Not Terminated. (Those letters also account for the image at the top of the article.) I wrote about ELOFANTs here.

The point of coining this acronym was to draw attention to the fact that one of the biggest risks to company networks and data are people who have departed the organization but still have access to some of all of its data: ELOFANTs. Here are a few data points to back that up:
ELOFANTs are not a new problem, but these days they may be a bigger problem than in the past thanks to the proliferation of apps that companies use, particularly cloud-based sharing and collaboration apps, credentials for which might not be centrally tracked like corporate network access usually is. So let me leave you with a couple of questions to which your organization's CISOs should know the answer: how do you determine what access to the organization's data a departing employee has, and how do you revoke it?
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